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You can work and still receive Social Security benefits. Social Security has rules called “Work Incentives”. With these rules, the amount of money you receive from Social Security will change as you earn more, but you will still get benefits to help you.

Did you know?
The rules for each Social Security program change when you turn 18. Benefits you receive as a child may stop or be different as an adult.


Getting Involved in Your CommunityThings to Do


Get a Job

You can work and still receive Social Security benefits. Social Security has rules called “Work Incentives”. With these rules, the amount of money you receive from Social Security will change as you earn more, but you will still get benefits to help you.

Contact a Benefit Specialist

You can find them at your local Aging and Disability Resource Center. They can help you understand your benefits and how they will change at age 18.

Contact a Work Incentives Benefit Specialist (WIBS).

Get help with the transition of benefits from childhood to adulthood. Find out about resources to help you work and achieve your health and money goals.

Working with Benefits

Did you know you can work even if you receive disability benefits? It’s true. If you have disability benefits and want to work, program rules called work incentives make work possible.

Other Benefits Resources:

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Before StartingThings to Ask

What if I’ve never had benefits before age 18?

If you don’t have benefits before age 18, but have a health condition which may make you eligible to receive them, contact the ADRC at 17 years 9 months of age to start the application process.


What benefits do I currently get?

Before age 18, income and assets of the parent(s) you live with are used to determine eligibility for SSI and the amount of benefits you’ll receive. Find out what you’re getting each month.


What benefits am I eligible for?

At age 18, only your personal income and assets are used to determine eligibility for SSI and the amount of benefits you’ll receive.


Did you know?
At age 18, people receiving SSI benefits go through the redetermination process. This is when Social Security determines whether your disability is severe enough to limit your ability to work at a specific level. Even though your condition may not change, Social Security might determine that you no longer have a disability.